New Media, Old News

February 5, 2009 at 5:09 pm | Posted in Chris Maue, Etcetra, restaurant, Review | 2 Comments
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Soup Man

I noticed a post on an stl blog about an ad for the Soup Man Kitchen, expressing surprise that a relic from the Seinfeld era of celebrity has set up shop in town… the only thing I can say is, having eaten at this place over a year ago, I can vouch that it’s at least that old, if not more… come on blogosphere keep up with the meatspace news!

For those of you who haven’t tried it out, It’s a pretty good place, with decent options (including Vegetarian and Vegan friendly options), and it doesn’t cost too much (the same as any quick lunch downtown). Check it out if you’re in the neighborhood (although I’ll still stick to Sen Thai, or the sandwiches at City Grocers).

2 Specialized happy hours to spice up your snow day eve

January 28, 2009 at 5:03 pm | Posted in activism | 1 Comment
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Two events for anyone looking for something to do (and willing to brave the weather) tonight:  

 

Smoke Free Stl is having a happy hour and fundraiser at the Royale tonight, going from 5:30pm until 7:30pm.  Admission is a $10 donation, which provides free appetizers, and the first ten in the door get free t-shirts.   I’m a supporter of theirs, and might be stopping by tonight.

 

In other news, there’s an open invitation for members of the Saint Louis film/video community to come to HOME Nightclub inside Ameristar Casino.  Admission is free, and there’s cheap drinks, so if you’re a filmmaker looking for something to do tonight, check it out

Better late than never: a review of Wendy and Lucy (by Adam Hofbauer

December 16, 2008 at 3:57 am | Posted in Adam Hofbauer, film, Review, SLIFF | 2 Comments
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wendy-and-lucyIn director Kelly Reichardt’s Wendy and Lucy, Michelle Williams portrays a young woman in search of work in a vast American road-scape. Accompanied by her dog, she becomes stranded in a small town in Oregon when her car breaks down, and the film follows her everyday struggle to survive in a state of homeless transience Illuminated by a strong performance by Williams and a stark, bare bones production design, Wendy and Lucy continues in the style established by Reichardt in her previous film, Old Joy. In doing so, it improves even on that great film’s merits, creating an inescapable sense of time and place, and a person lost within both.
Williams disappears into her role, looking boyish and almost masculine in her unwashed and exhausted state. And while sometimes an unknown face contributes to our empathy for a character, it is the fact that we recognize Williams that makes her all the more convincing. In the last few months, this has become a country where poverty can seemingly strike anyone at any moment. And here is a movie-star, recognizable from television shows and tabloid headlines, portraying someone as hopeless and exhausted as one can possible become.

Continue Reading Better late than never: a review of Wendy and Lucy (by Adam Hofbauer…

Mad Art

December 12, 2008 at 6:02 pm | Posted in Art Show, Chris Maue, exhibition, Mad Art | 1 Comment
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While we’re on the subject of last minute events,   

The Mad Art Gallery is having an exhibition/auction tonight, put on by the Barnes-Jewish College Student Government and Student Nurses Association.  Titled “To Kenya With Love,” the auction will raise money to fund the newborn ward at Kenyatta National Hospital in Nairobi, Kenya.   

The event begins at 7pm, ends at 11, and is free to the public.

Discover America Tonight at SLSO

December 12, 2008 at 5:53 pm | Posted in Chris Maue, Concert, music, SLSO | 1 Comment
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cdbigThis is a little bit last minute, but if anyone’s looking for something interesting and fun to do tonight, SLSO is continuing their ongoing Classical Detours series at Powell Hall, with tonight’s theme – Discover America.    Enjoy several pieces by American composers Bernstein, Copland, Rodgers, and even John Williams.      In SLSO’s own words: 

“No “Jingle Bells.” No “Rudolph.” The SLSO offers holiday relief.”

 

And, as always, the performance is prefaced with free beer sampling courtesy of Schlafly. 

 

– FREE TICKET INFORMATION –

 

Although it may be too late to use this info tonight, RFT vetran and current SLSO blogger Eddie Silva sent me this info on how to get FREE TICKETS to SLSO shows.    Read on:

 

50 Free Ticket Program:

The Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra offers 50 free tickets to the public for all of its regular Orchestral concerts (except Coffee Concerts). To receive your free ticket you must have a 50 Free Membership Card. To get your card simply stop by the Saint Louis Symphony Box Office and sign up for your free card. The card entitles you to a free ticket to six  orchestral concerts per season. To redeem for your ticket, present your card and a valid picture ID at the Box Office window 2 hours before a valid concert.  Tickets will be handed out for 30 minutes or until all 50 tickets have been distributed.  Cards will be punched each time you receive a ticket. Tickets are given to valid free ticket card holders on a first come basis. One free ticket card per person per season.

SLIFF 2008 Reviews from Day 10

December 10, 2008 at 5:02 pm | Posted in Brian Vacek, Movies, Review, SLIFF | 2 Comments

Day 10: Sunday 11/23 (Notes: This was the final day and my overall favorite.)

From Inside and The Wrestler

Title: From Inside
Director: John Bergin
Country: USA
Score: 10
Review:
Graphic novelist Bergin adapts his own nightmares into an animated feature film with a half-dozen crew members, Maya 3D software and a whole lot of patience. The result is one of the best movies at SLIFF, though it was largely tucked away in the same time slot of the buzz-generating “Waltz with Bashir.” Nevertheless, I was determined not to miss it after reading the synopsis (a destination-unknown train traveling through a surreal post-apocalyptic wasteland) and watching the trailer. I couldn’t help resonating powerfully with the film, though I am clearly more biased towards it than I expect others would be (I love trains, surrealism and post-apocalyptic landscapes. Also, my own student short, based on my nightmares, had a similar premise).

“From Inside” uses a combination of CG and hand-painted watercolors from Bergin’s graphic novel to illustrate the haunting locomotive voyage of pregnant girl. She doesn’t remember where her train comes from and neither she, nor the passengers nor even the engineers know where it is going. Outside the windows, a featureless landscape passes by. It is eventually overtaken by startling locations: a rusting bridge, a sea of blood, flooded ruins, a monumental refinery, an endless tunnel and more.

Our introverted protagonist provides narration in lieu of dialogue, keeping us in claustrophobic isolation from the other passengers. We spend our time in her dreams and private reveries instead of the roaming omniscient perspective audiences are used to. Her voice has an eerie, hypnotic quality that ties together the bleak, but imaginative, artwork. Though it completely eschews notions of hope and salvation, “From Inside’s” disturbing imagery and brooding score still reaches a spiritual crescendo that is profoundly moving.

After gushing to the sound designer afterwards, his wife gave my brother and me unofficial copies of the film. I’ll be watching it often. The From Inside website should have information on the official DVD when it becomes available.

Title: The Wrestler
Director: Darren Aronofsky
Country: USA
Score: 9.5
Review:
Aronofsky’s latest film may be his most mature, and it certainly managed to convince critics (it took the Golden Lion at Venice) of what cult audiences already know: that Aronofsky is one of the most important directors of the last ten years.

“The Wrestler” is Randy “The Ram” Robinson (Mickey Rourke), a WWF-style professional wrestler 20 years past his prime. Sitting at a sparsely-attended merchandise signing, he notices that most of his peers have leg braces, wheelchairs and other evidence of their fading health. Randy isn’t immune either; his rigorous tanning and toning doesn’t disguise the fact that his body is breaking down. He wears a hearing aid and stuffs himself with drugs to sustain everything from fists and folding chairs to barbed wire and staple guns. Most threatening is his failing heart. Outside the ring his life is also a mess: he is frequently locked out of his trailer, works odd hours at a grocery store to make ends meet and has an estranged lesbian daughter who hates him.

Marisa Tomei plays Randy’s romantic interest, a stripper nearing retirement age. Far from being a simple plot device for their mutual redemption, her character has a life nearly as full of complications and contradictions. She definitely goes all-out in her role, giving Rourke a run for his money and one-upping her eyebrow-raising role in “Before the Devil Knows Your Dead” for sheer nudity. I’ve got more than a little bit of a crush on Tomei, and I can guarantee that anyone who shares that sentiment will go away happy.

Aronofsky’s approach is touchingly realistic, reminding me of the unsentimental humanism of the Dardenne brothers. Mickey Rourke gives a career performance as The Ram, not just looking the part perfectly, but imbuing the character with a likability that I would have thought impossible (as I hate wrestling). Randy is a throwback to the 80’s, a decade he desperately misses both for its culture of reveling in devil-may-care extremism and for his personal stardom. Yet Aronofsky manages to do a lot more than merely play on nostalgia (he wisely does without flashbacks) or to harp on how pathetic Randy is (I even sensed an affectionate tone at times), by making us care about a character we’d normally laugh at.

The film brings the boxing genre (I’m defining it loosely) into the present day. It leaves films like “Cinderella Man” and “Rocky Balboa” weeping in the locker room, revealing them to be mere has-beens compared to the freshness and defiance of this film. “The Wrestler” owes more to “Raging Bull” (1980), a film Aronofsky consciously references in one of his funniest scenes: a continuous tracking shot of Randy entering, not a stadium, but a deli. I imagine that Aronofsky can sit back for a while and just let the Oscars come pouring in.

SLIFF 2008 Reviews from Day 9

December 9, 2008 at 4:58 pm | Posted in Brian Vacek, Movies, Review, SLIFF | 1 Comment

Day 9: Saturday 11/22

The Trap and Yesterday Was a Lie

Title: The Trap
Director: Srdan Golubovic
Country: Serbia
Score: 8.0
Review:
Even if I live to be a hundred, I’ll probably never get tired of noirs featuring an essentially good man who tries to do the right thing, but makes one wrong decision that sends his soul spiraling towards damnation. “The Trap” is an excellent example and superb companion piece for Wim Wenders’ similar “The American Friend.”

Mladen is a state engineer who can’t possibly afford the 26,000 Euros price tag when he discovers that his son will die without a rare operation. In spite of his pride, Mladen’s wife puts a help ad in the paper. Eventually there’s a response… from a man who wants Mladen to assassinate in exchange for the money.

“The Trap” tries a little too hard to justify Mladen’s actions, when it’s a foregone conclusion that he’ll accept the assignment (since otherwise this would be a different kind of movie). I think Golubovic is a bit too insistent when he tries to convince us that we would do the same thing in the same circumstances. Still, at least the motivations are realistic enough and it leads us to the consequences, which is where the film really comes alive.

Every goes wrong, of course. The victim turns out to be a husband and father. Mladen likes (and maybe even has a crush on?) the wife. Meanwhile, the stress and secrecy causes Mladen’s own marriage to fall apart. The criminals don’t come through with the money. The police don’t buy his story. And all the while his son is still dying.

The shift from dealing with tough decision to tough consequences is pessimistic, but uncompromising. One finds it irresistible to get caught up in Mladen’s plight and to share his frustration and despair. There’s a sense that his tale is a metaphor for the way individuals are crushed by fate, society, economy and other forces beyond their control, but it’s never too blunt to distract from the personal crisis.

A lot of the symbolism is handled in interesting ways. Mladen’s son, for instance, draws countless pictures that are brightly-colored and full of fantastic imagery in contrast to Mladen’s increasingly bleak reality. I particularly liked that the night before Mladen agrees to do the hit he sits in the rain at an empty intersection and eventually runs a red light (confirming, on an infinitely smaller scale, that he is ready to break the law). Later, he will remain stopped in front of a green light as he comes to accept that his life is at a dead-end.

The acting is really quite well done, never crossing over the line into excessive histrionics. The worst part may have been the makeup, which is inexplicably overly purple all the time (cold lips, tired eyes, bruises) and takes away some of the attention from Glogovac’s (as Mladen) highly facial performance. The film also make good use of shallow focus, dirty locations and bad weather to give off a sullen noir atmosphere.

Title: Yesterday Was a Lie
Director: James Kerwin
Country: USA
Score: 5.0
Review:
The surprisingly controversial content of the review has been removed by the author. See the original for a fuller discussion.

SLIFF 2008 Reviews from Day 8

December 8, 2008 at 4:55 pm | Posted in Brian Vacek, Movies, Review, SLIFF | Comments Off

Day 8: Friday 11/21(Notes: This was my second favorite day of the festival overall. I did not see any films on day 7.)

The Custodian and Timecrimes

Title: The Custodian
Director: Rodrigo Moreno
Country: Argentina
Score: 9.5
Review:
As I discovered last year, the bustle of the festival and running about from theater to theater after work while still trying to fit in food, sleep and life can make it difficult to ease into the pace of slower, meditative films. Festival season tends to make me particularly conscious of poor editing, excessive length and lugubrious pacing. Yet every once in a while a film like “The Custodian” comes by and reassures me that it’s not my attention span that’s the problem; some films can be slow and minimalist and still be utterly fascinating.

The custodian (or “minder” in the more direct translations), Ruben, is a personal bodyguard for Artemio, an important minister. Ruben has managed to erase almost all outward evidence of his identity, forming himself into a diligent, silent, opaque presence that it variously ignored and abused by the family he is sworn to protect. Ruben quietly suffers each indignity without comment. For instance, he must wait outside while Artemio conducts extramarital affairs and must watch silently when Artemio’s daughter messes around with a boy in the backseat of the chauffeur’s car.

Ruben’s own family, a neurotic sister and her untalented daughter, offers no comfort or understanding. What goes on inside his head is not known. He remains a mystery, although we discover hints: he’s a talented sketch-artist (his pictures reveal possible romantic and sexual fantasies), was once a hero in the military and he cares more about the world than he lets on.

Moreno’s direction and Barbara Alvarez’s cinematography is some of the best I’ve seen this year. They shoot scenes with nearly mathematical precision (overhead shots of Artemio’s parking arrangements are frigidly geometric) in cold clean colors and 90 degree arrangements that are emotionally neutral. Unusual close-ups and shallow focus guide our attention to unimportant details, creating an atmosphere that reflects both Ruben’s boredom and his observant nature. A clever thematic touch is that Ruben never passes through a door while the camera is watching, putting him and the audience forever outside the action.

“The Custodian” is actually so hypnotic when almost nothing is happening, that I actually had a twinge of regret when the action picked up. When Ruben is given scenes like a family dinner party and a visit to a prostitute, I felt that these more overt “events” broke the spell of the gentle rhythm. The ending twist, however, feels right and sort of justifies the rising action.

Fans of Jean-Pierre Melville, Fabian Bielinsky and Bela Tarr should like this one.

Title: Timecrimes
Director: Nacho Vigalondo
Country: Spain
Score: 9.0
Review:
Hector has just moved into a new house with his loving wife. He’s lounging around in the backyard when he thinks he spots a woman stripping in the woods. His natural voyeurism takes over. He goes to investigate, only to be stabbed by a bandaged killer and forced to flee into a secluded laboratory. The only person on staff, a suspicious young scientist, encourages him to hide in a strange cylinder of fluid. He emerges earlier that same day and gradually comes to accept that he has traveled through time. While trying to prevent any paradoxes from occurring, he inadvertently commits a horrible crime and must complicate things even further to undo the past.

Vigalondo’s three act screenplay (with each act covering the same handful of hours) is one of the funnest and cleverest time-travel plots of recent memory. The first act features all sorts of strange, unexplained details, allowing TT veterans to anticipate how they are going to fit into the timeline. The second act then follows through in a manner that I think is intentionally predictable and familiar. Then the third act comes along and makes mince meat of the other two with post-modern humor and surprising twists.

The plot is quite entertaining in itself, but Vigalondo accentuates it’s with a very distinctive brand of humor that does almost entirely without dialogue-based “jokes.” I laughed out loud several times, often purely due to the beautiful timing and symmetry of the action (the storyboarding and editing must have been excruciatingly rigorous). The balance of the cast (there are only four actors) is quite neat, with Hector’s development taking center stage. The way he transforms from naïve pawn to steely mastermind as he learns the ins and outs of time travel, is perfectly displayed by his body language and, quite literally, his body, which becomes increasingly bruised and bloodied.

Vigalondo has done all the hard work for us behind the scenes. TT veterans will be pleased to discover that his screenplay is free from obvious plot holes, while TT newbies should find the complicated plot relatively easy to follow. Since it is both more playful and less mentally strenuous, I’d call this (wait for it…) a good primer for “Primer.” Both films are excellent investigations of the scientific and moral complexities of TT, but while “Primer” is so dark and challenging as to sit permanently in the cult corner, “Timecrimes” is already slated for an American remake. Word is that David Cronenberg will direct, which would be seriously cool, but see this first (and then see “Primer,” which is even better).

News About Other Films, and Human Rights

December 8, 2008 at 2:54 am | Posted in activism, Chris Maue, film, stl, Theater | 2 Comments
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In keeping with the constant stream of film review posts that Brian has been faithfully putting up for the last few days, I’ve got a few events you might want to keep your eye on as well -

Doerr Center for Social Justice Education is sponsoring a showing of Morgan Spurlock’s documentary “What Would Jesus Buy.”  The event is at 1:30 in the Carlo Auditorium of Tegler Hall, 3550 Lindell Blvd.  The Showing is free, and open to the public.

Also, don’t miss Amnesty International’s Sponsored Showing of “Invisible Children.”  at  Lafayette High School from 6pm until 8pm, on Thursday the 11th.  If you haven’t seen this film yet, make a point to – it’s a real eye opener.

December 10th is International Human Rights Day, as well as A Day Without Gay – a day to protest discrimination based on sexual orientation, by not showing up to work and calling in ‘Gay’.

There are some pretty cool events going on in town, including a Day Without Gay Teach-in hosted on December 10th at the Tivoli Theater in the Loop.  The event starts at 9am, and Concludes around 4pm, with a free screening of “Milk.”  More details can be found at http://showmenohate.blogspot.com/

Finally, The Webster Film Series will be showing “Christmastime On Mars,” the psychadelic freak out Christmas feature, made over the course of six years by the Flaming Lips.   The film features amazing performances by the band, especially Wayne Coyne as the alien superbeing that saves Christmas.   The film shows December 12th, and 13th at 9pm, and the 14th at  7pm.  General admission is $6.

More info on many of these events, as well as other happenings this week in St. Louis, can be found at the Show Me Progress Blog

SLIFF 2008 Reviews from Day 6

December 7, 2008 at 4:52 pm | Posted in Brian Vacek, Movies, Review, SLIFF | 1 Comment

Day 6: Wednesday 11/19

The Pope’s Toilet and Stranded

Title: The Pope’s Toilet
Director: Cesar Chalone and Enrique Fernandez
Country: Uruguay
Score: 6.0
Review:
Beto is a smalltime border smuggler just this side of Uruguay from Brazil. His “work” consists of heart-pounding 60 mile bicycle trips across the open countryside with the risk of raids and financial ruin on any voyage. He lives in a small shack with his devout wife and unhappy daughter, who longs to become a reporter. When news comes out that the Pope will be stopping in their remote village to give a speech, everyone in town plans to pull themselves out of poverty by selling food to the tens of thousands of projected visitors. Beto plans to capitalize on the situation from the opposite end: by charging for use of a homemade restroom.

The simple setup allows plenty of time to get to know the family and to witness the humor and pain they cause each other. The film’s greatest success is its honest, unsentimental portrayal of poverty, where limited resources cause harsh competition and families are so desperate to escape their conditions that they will risk everything on inflated hopes. The casting of non-actors works beautifully and each of the central three characters gives fresh, realistic performances.

However, I was annoyed at the directors’ decisions in how they portrayed this based-on-a-real-life story. Whether it’s intentional dramatic irony or not, I never for a moment believed that a happy ending was possible. The tension and buildup for the inevitable disappointment felt hallow and manipulative to me. Ill-advised music rubs the disaster in our face. I found that I was holding myself back from emotionally connecting with the characters because I was conscious of the directors’ intentions from very early on.

Title: Stranded: I Have Come From a Plane that Crashed in the Mountains
Director: Gonzalo Arijon
Country: Uruguay
Score: 5.0
Review:
Arijon’s much-hailed documentary revisits a headline that captured international attention in 1972. A rugby team from Uruguay crash-landed on a snow-covered Andean mountain and survived for 72 days before they were able to contact civilization. Untreated injuries, starvation, extreme-cold and depression plague the stranded boys. Two-thirds of the passengers die and the remainder resorted to cannibalism to survive.

I’m occasionally accused of being too tough on documentaries, and I’m likely to draw that complaint once again. Let me first say, though, that the story of these survivors is absolutely captivating and inspiring. When I rate a documentary, however, only a small amount of the score is based on the topic chosen while the primary thing I try to judge is the presentation of the subject. For that reason, I was not much impressed by “Stranded,” which looks and feels like a routine television special.

Arijon’s re-enactments are particularly uninspired. He uses vague, shaky clips where you can’t really see any details and grainy filters try to convince us the footage is old or damaged. This material doesn’t capture anything of the reality, not even the atmosphere or terror, and serves very little purpose except as filler. I’m sure the idea was to temper the talking heads syndrome that is brought on by trying to tell the story through interviews decades after the fact. The most interesting visual moments, notably, are the authentic photographs and the news footage near the end.

I think a full-scale paid-actor/set-recreation treatment would have been worthwhile and compelling. In fact, I’d have probably liked a film adaptation more than any documentary version, but that’s purely personal taste. As a documentary, I felt it relied too heavily on the emotional emphasis and didn’t give enough facts to really appreciate the situation. Despite the film’s totally unnecessary 126 minute run-time, I was left still fairly clueless and curious at the end:

How cold did it get at night? How much battery power was in the radio? Did they build snow-shoes or sleds to travel over the snow drifts? Were they able to build fires? How did they decide which direction to head off in? What was the decision hierarchy like? Did they converse or invent games to pass the time or sit in silence? How far away were they from the nearest village? Do they keep in touch today? Etc, etc, etc.

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